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I'm currently in the process of buying a tent trailer and want to tow it with my Santa Fe. The dry weight of the trailer is 2000lbs. I'm quite confused about what my car is equipped with.
I have a 2011 Hyundai Santa Fe V6, 3.4 Limited. I bought it used and it had a hitch on it which we have used to tow a lighter trailer in the past. I had to extend the 4way flat wiring from inside the panels to the back near the hitch for lights.
Now the trailer I am buying has breaks, but I'm not sure how to set my vehicle up for the breaking system. I called the dealership and they told me the hitch was put on by them after the car was bought, but that's all they could tell me. I've called other dealerships in the area and they are all giving me conflicting answers about how much I can tow and if the car already has trailer break system installed.
Has anyone run into this in the past? Thanks for your help.
Eric
 

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I'm currently in the process of buying a tent trailer and want to tow it with my Santa Fe. The dry weight of the trailer is 2000lbs. I'm quite confused about what my car is equipped with.
I have a 2011 Hyundai Santa Fe V6, 3.4 Limited. I bought it used and it had a hitch on it which we have used to tow a lighter trailer in the past. I had to extend the 4way flat wiring from inside the panels to the back near the hitch for lights.
Now the trailer I am buying has breaks, but I'm not sure how to set my vehicle up for the breaking system. I called the dealership and they told me the hitch was put on by them after the car was bought, but that's all they could tell me. I've called other dealerships in the area and they are all giving me conflicting answers about how much I can tow and if the car already has trailer break system installed.
Has anyone run into this in the past? Thanks for your help.
Eric
I have the later model (2015... a DM.2) with 2.2 litre diesel engine /6sp auto. However the rear suspension is very similar. If you have the owner's manual the towing capacity is min 1500kg (3300lbs) and a max. tow ball down-force weight of 100kg (220lbs). I don't know how handy you are with tools but you can purchase Hyundai heavy duty rear coil springs for a couple of hundred dollars. It takes a competent amateur with jack stands and a set of spanners about an hour each side (including a cup of coffee...) It's a very straight forward job. The replacement springs extend the max.down-force limit to 150kg (330lbs). I did this in the driveway on a sunny day (I'm well past retirement age so it's not onerous!). The ride unladen with the new springs is very acceptable, indeed it handles a tad firmer and is more responsive. When I pack camping gear in the "boot/trunk" the headlight beams don't 'reach for the sky' as before.
That being done, you need then to find out what sort of brakes are fitted to your trailer (the Hyundai requires trailer brakes for total trailer weight exceeding 750kg (say 1700 lbs)
Brake controller: On the basis that the wiring is "4 way", then that covers basic clearance/stop/indicator lights. A connector which accommodates a brake controller will have one pin which is larger to cope with the higher amps required to activate the electric brakes. Normally this will be a 5 pin or 7 pin connector at least.
To check further, there is normally a "black box" somewhere under the dashboard and a rotating knob / slider switch for adjusting the sensitivity of the trailer braking effort. Some of them are "progressive" and incorporate an accelerometer which apportions braking effort depending on how heavy/light you apply the vehicle's brakes.

There are numerous YouTube videos on how to install a brake controller, including one on a Hyundai Santa Fe sponsored by a US Hyundai dealer...(sorry, I saw it in passing but can't remember 'when'). If I keep my other SF (2019) I'll probably fit one.

A Tekonsha P3 brake controller is what I fitted to my 17yr old Range Rover (now sold) I used it on very rough outback roads ...I'd buy another (brake controller that is馃槀). You can buy one on Amazon I believe.
hope this helps(y)
 

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Sorry... not sure how to edit the previous response...the MAX towing gross weight for a braked trailer for a 2011 Hyundai SF is 2000kg (4400 lbs). The standard springs will take a MAX tow-ball down force of 100kg (220lb). Uprated springs: 4400lbs towing / 330 lbs down-force on tow ball
 

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I have the later model (2015... a DM.2) with 2.2 litre diesel engine /6sp auto. However the rear suspension is very similar. If you have the owner's manual the towing capacity is min 1500kg (3300lbs) and a max. tow ball down-force weight of 100kg (220lbs). I don't know how handy you are with tools but you can purchase Hyundai heavy duty rear coil springs for a couple of hundred dollars. It takes a competent amateur with jack stands and a set of spanners about an hour each side (including a cup of coffee...) It's a very straight forward job. The replacement springs extend the max.down-force limit to 150kg (330lbs). I did this in the driveway on a sunny day (I'm well past retirement age so it's not onerous!). The ride unladen with the new springs is very acceptable, indeed it handles a tad firmer and is more responsive. When I pack camping gear in the "boot/trunk" the headlight beams don't 'reach for the sky' as before.
That being done, you need then to find out what sort of brakes are fitted to your trailer (the Hyundai requires trailer brakes for total trailer weight exceeding 750kg (say 1700 lbs)
Brake controller: On the basis that the wiring is "4 way", then that covers basic clearance/stop/indicator lights. A connector which accommodates a brake controller will have one pin which is larger to cope with the higher amps required to activate the electric brakes. Normally this will be a 5 pin or 7 pin connector at least.
To check further, there is normally a "black box" somewhere under the dashboard and a rotating knob / slider switch for adjusting the sensitivity of the trailer braking effort. Some of them are "progressive" and incorporate an accelerometer which apportions braking effort depending on how heavy/light you apply the vehicle's brakes.

There are numerous YouTube videos on how to install a brake controller, including one on a Hyundai Santa Fe sponsored by a US Hyundai dealer...(sorry, I saw it in passing but can't remember 'when'). If I keep my other SF (2019) I'll probably fit one.

A Tekonsha P3 brake controller is what I fitted to my 17yr old Range Rover (now sold) I used it on very rough outback roads ...I'd buy another (brake controller that is馃槀). You can buy one on Amazon I believe.
hope this helps(y)
Hello! You mentioned obtaining Hyundai heavy duty rear coil springs, but I have a 2018 3.3L Santa Fe SE and am unable to find those springs from either our local Hyundai dealer or an afer-market dealer, so can you please advise where to find them? Thanks
 

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G'day!
when I did a bit of digging I discovered that the springs may be a local official Hyundai accessory
Here are some references...
the Hyundai Australia Spares Part number is: S1A72APH00K
Good luck with it!!
cheers
 
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