Hyundai Santa Fe Forums banner

1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just changed both the timing belts, bearings, crankshaft position sensor and water pump on my 2004 Santa Fe with a 2.4 (this weekend). I found the job slightly more difficult than other vehicles I have done similar work on. Hondas are way easier. There were several times when the amount of work space made things quite difficult. Even just getting the water pump pulley clear of the inner body. If you were ONLY changing the main timing belt (not including the second smaller belt or any other components) I think it would have been very quick and easy (and CHEAP). But I did not know the history of the vehicle - so I did all the parts and the water pump and CPS just to be safe. It was a bit of a PITA to remove the power steering pump and bracket to gain access to the crankshaft position wire. I bought a GENUINE crankshaft position sensor (that's for sure). The old one was working, but I saw on you tube and read that those sensors are prone to failure. I was already doing the belt. Besides the PS bracket had to come off to access the idle bearing (one of the timing belt components). The water pump was pretty tight getting it in and out. I see a couple of possibilities with respect to the water pump gasket. Glue it to the pump first, or as I did in my case, tie it to the pump with five little short pieces of dental floss. It must have worked OK - I have not seen any leaks (so far). Oh - another little 'trick' I thought up to hold the camshafts. Neither of the camshafts wanted to "sit" right on the marks. So - in the two top cover bolt holes at the top of the engine I screwed two quite long bolts (couple of inches) by hand so they stuck out. then I put a 17mm box end wrench (12 point) on the camshaft sprocket bolt and positioned the wrench in such a way so the pressure from the camshaft (when held in the perfect position) was pushing on the bolt sticking out. I did the same for the second camshaft. Neither moved. The rest was pretty easy. There is a neat trick on you tube about getting the balance shaft on the front of the engine in the correct position (there are actually TWO balance shafts on the 2.4 engine). Just let gravity roll it into where it wants to be (and is supposed to be). There is a bolt you can remove from the front of the block by the exhaust manifold to confirm the shaft is in the correct alignment (using a rod). I used a short end of 1.5 inch ABS with a flange to tap in the crankshaft seal. I got a new tensioner as well. I did not realize how slowly you are supposed to squeeze hydraulic tensioners back together. On my Camry I did not spend 5 minutes - in fact I probably only spent about one. I worry that I might have damaged the seals in it. I may look at that Camry again when the weather gets nicer. Anyway - my Santa Fe rides again (well, it WAS actually running before I took it apart). As a bonus, I won't have to do that particular job on this Santa Fe ever again, and a broken T-belt is unlikely to happen for as long as I own it (interference engine) - and it'll be a good selling feature when it is time to move on. My next project on that little Santa Fe - when it warms up, I think I might drop the oil pan and see if I can sneak in a set of connecting rod bearings. It rattles a wee bit after an oil change (before pressure is up) and that motor has 250K kilometers on the clock. Thirty bucks and a tube of silicone seem cheap enough, and I will tie it into an oil change as well. Good luck to any of you who choose to do your own work!!!
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top