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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Picture of the actual recall attached below, courtesy of another forum. This was in Canada, but the recall clearly includes the US market, since the SF mentions the US market production date range. I saw it coming, as more and more SFs were having tranny issues. Mine cleared the recall by a hair (04/09/22), so just mildly concerned Hyundai got the dates right. Ha ha. Anyway, no fix yet, but I assume Hyundai will have to replace the pumps now, rather than the transmissions. We'll see. Hope this helps.
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Somebody posted the TSB that lead to the recall on another forum, so I attached it below. It only covered 2021 SFs, so my 2022 should supposedly be spared... BUT the recall includes 2022s, so it's possible that bad HF oil pumps went beyond the recall, including mine. At least we now know issues are possible with BOTH HP and HF oil pumps. Hopefully we can get more clarity on that soon. Hope this helps too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Hey gang, found yet another TSB for shift quality, and this time if affects my SF (up to 07/11/22), but I'm not going to do anything about it now, since I really like how it shifts. The TSB is probably aimed at early DCTs, since it goes back to 2020, when there were shifting complaints. But in case any of you have shifting issues (curious what constitutes 'unacceptable' shifting on a DCT) on your newer SF, now you have proof to get it corrected. Hope this helps as well. TSB attached below.
 

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Newbie here, got bit by the tranny issue (NHTSA Recall attached). 2021 Santa Fe Limited FWD 13,400 miles. Description is exactly what happened to me, no acceleration, car barely moves then nada and engine light. Sitting roadside waiting 2 hours for someone from AAA through Hyundai Roadside Assistance (we were in rural northern WI) to show up, I periodically started it and the last time the engine light was off, it shifted into gear so we took off and the car drove fine. Next day it happened again and called local and towed into the nearest dealer 90 miles away, Been sitting at the dealer since Monday, they haven't even looked at it yet. We live 200 miles away and rented a car to get home.

We have a 2011 Santa Fe Limited 150,000 miles at home and only issue ever was an oil pressure sending unit went out at 100k.

Can't wait to see how this turns out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry to hear. And thank you for posting the official NHTSA recall. Having said that, I'm surprised the 'cause' is stated as lacking a better 'fail safe' software. That's absolute crap. Yes, it's important to have that, but that doesn't address the problem the freaking pumps are failing internally. My guess is DCTs will continue to fail (although less dangerously), and Hyundai will continue to quietly replace those that fail, just like they've been doing it now. And once warranty is over, tough luck. Now I don't know how I feel about my SF not being included in the recall. It could still be affected, like all others, but just won't quit suddenly, I guess due to the less aggressive 'fail sale' crap. We'll see as time passes, I guess.
 

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I talked with the dealer yesterday and they "promised" to look at the Santa Fe on Monday. OK, we will see...they seem too think its just a software update :rolleyes: not sure I want to drive it 200 miles home after just an update.
Seems like Hyundai knew about and fixed the issue in April of 2022 but waited till now for the recall. Not sure what the criteria is for a recall but maybe it took that long to reach? Will update when I hear from them on Monday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Found further info on the issue, coming from Kia. Here is the .pdf link to their recall: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2022/RCLRPT-22V760-3227.PDF

As you can read on page 2, there's a circuit board that can become detached at any time, causing a total power loss without any warning, so I'd refrain from using an affected vehicle on a long trip, for instance. Also disturbing is the dates after the issue was corrected: August 2022. Hyundai said April, when my SF was built (04/09/22). Now I don't know what to believe. Maybe Hyundai just did the 'software update' on those models, but didn't change the HP pump. Who knows. Hopefully we'll get more clarity in the future, but in the mean time, this Kia recall gives us a better understanding of what's happening with the trannies. Hope this helps.
 

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Found further info on the issue, coming from Kia. Here is the .pdf link to their recall: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2022/RCLRPT-22V760-3227.PDF

As you can read on page 2, there's a circuit board that can become detached at any time, causing a total power loss without any warning, so I'd refrain from using an affected vehicle on a long trip, for instance. Also disturbing is the dates after the issue was corrected: August 2022. Hyundai said April, when my SF was built (04/09/22). Now I don't know what to believe. Maybe Hyundai just did the 'software update' on those models, but didn't change the HP pump. Who knows. Hopefully we'll get more clarity in the future, but in the mean time, this Kia recall gives us a better understanding of what's happening with the trannies. Hope this helps.
Found further info on the issue, coming from Kia. Here is the .pdf link to their recall: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2022/RCLRPT-22V760-3227.PDF

As you can read on page 2, there's a circuit board that can become detached at any time, causing a total power loss without any warning, so I'd refrain from using an affected vehicle on a long trip, for instance. Also disturbing is the dates after the issue was corrected: August 2022. Hyundai said April, when my SF was built (04/09/22). Now I don't know what to believe. Maybe Hyundai just did the 'software update' on those models, but didn't change the HP pump. Who knows. Hopefully we'll get more clarity in the future, but in the mean time, this Kia recall gives us a better understanding of what's happening with the trannies. Hope this helps.
This is super concerning since Kia and Hyundai are sister companies. I have a 2023 SF Limited that was built at the Alabama facility in August. I was praying they had corrected this issue but it appears that isn’t the case. Already had a serious issue with our 21 Palisade Calligraphy and we had to turn that car in. The dealership gave us this 2023. Makes me just sick 🤢
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You know, if your SF was built in August, there's a VERY HIGH likelihood it's out of the woods at least on the transmission front. Which August day? It says on the door pillar label at the bottom. But I wouldn't worry if I were you. I'm a bit worried, since my '22 was built on April 09, barely clearing the March 31 range. We need more information on Kias, since it's possible the engines they use are made at a different facility, but it still doesn't make sense they're freaking 5 months apart. Ha ha. But don't worry for now. I also had a '21 Palisade Calligraphy, and my '22 SF Calligraphy is way better in every regard, including extra equipment, like power folding mirrors. It's just a tad smaller, but feels MUCH smaller when driving, and we don't need a 3rd row, so it was a mistake to buy it. I sold it over what I paid including accessories and taxes, but never an issue in almost 10K miles. What issues you had with yours? Just curious. Take care.
 

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You know, if your SF was built in August, there's a VERY HIGH likelihood it's out of the woods at least on the transmission front. Which August day? It says on the door pillar label at the bottom. But I wouldn't worry if I were you. I'm a bit worried, since my '22 was built on April 09, barely clearing the March 31 range. We need more information on Kias, since it's possible the engines they use are made at a different facility, but it still doesn't make sense they're freaking 5 months apart. Ha ha. But don't worry for now. I also had a '21 Palisade Calligraphy, and my '22 SF Calligraphy is way better in every regard, including extra equipment, like power folding mirrors. It's just a tad smaller, but feels MUCH smaller when driving, and we don't need a 3rd row, so it was a mistake to buy it. I sold it over what I paid including accessories and taxes, but never an issue in almost 10K miles. What issues you had with yours? Just curious. Take care.
First off I want to say I so appreciate your response. It was a breath of fresh air, and I needed to hear exactly what you just said. So again thank you!
The issue we were having with the palisade was when I was driving it would apply the emergency brake for no reason. It happened twice on the freeway and three times on the surface street. The dealership could not duplicate the issue and did not know why it was happening because they said my sensors were just fine. Anyway, it was extremely scary and I’m thankful we were never rear ended. I am so in agreement with you. The palisade was a mistake because it was more car than we needed. I love the Santa Fe, which is why I am so heartbroken over this whole engine recall business. My Santa Fe was built on August 24 at the Alabama plant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
You should be good :). And hoping I'm good too. All SFs are made in Alabama, by the way. At least the ones for the US and Canada. But not sure what's the deal with the DCTs; my window sticker says they're made in 'USA/Korea'. Not sure what that means; if some are made in the US, and others in Korea, or just some components in Korea, and the rest here. At any rate, DCTs are different animals than a regular torque-converter (TC) auto, so if you want to minimize the wear on it, and also to enjoy it more, owners need to understand how they work. You probably know that already, but below is a good video to show that (and some comments below the video):


First thing is to avoid getting the tranny 'confused' where you know it'd get confused, like slowing down, and then needing to suddenly accelerate. In that case, you can downshift manually, so the tranny stays in gear, rather than disengaging the clutch, thinking you're going to stop. And if slowing down almost to a stop, downshift to 1st, so you can take off quickly. You can switch back to D with the 'D' button, or pushing the right (+) paddle for half a second (which is confirmed by an annoying 'beep'). A DCT keeps you more engaged than a regular transmission, and that's why I like them better than those, and use the paddles most of the time... but not everybody likes them. If there's no instance that you think it needs help, then perfect; you can just drive it in D. But at least now you'll know what to do if you ever catch the tranny flat-footed. Ha ha. Hope this helps.
 

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2021 Santa Fe UPDATE: Sorry this is long! Car has NOT been looked at yet!! Still sitting at the dealer 200 miles away since October 10th. I spoke with Hyundai Consumer Affairs which is pretty much worthless, who suggested I should talk with my local dealer and see when they could work on it and then arrange transport to them and Hyundai would look at reimbursement? WAIT..I am to arrange transport and Hyundai may reimburse? Talked to my dealer who actually called the dealer where the car is sitting and was told by their service manager, and I use that title very loosely as well, that I was told it would take 3-4 weeks for the car to be looked at. That is a bold face lie!! I was told it would be looked at by October 14 and then again by October 21. Their policy is because its a tow in that they give it the next available service appointment which was like October 31! Seriously? My dealer said if I got the car to the them they would look at it the day after it arrived or the next depending on when it came in. This led to multiple attempts to get someone at Hyundai to agree to have it transported 200 miles to my dealer which was a comedy of errors of being transferred to multiple departments including roadside assistance who stated their limit was a 20 mile tow? Is that right? Anyway, I then called my Case Manager, again using that title loosely, and left a voicemail that in no uncertain terms would I seek out, arrange or pay for transport to my dealer. That is their responsibility due to the flaw in their vehicle and their dealer's ineptness and unwillingness to fix my car expeditiously. Got an email back, he must be afraid to talk to me, that the dealer said I was told it would take 3-4 weeks to look at and thank you for choosing Hyundai! HA! Hilarious... Then I found out last night that my niece's in-laws had the same thing happen to their Santa Fe and it took 2 months to get their car back! Once they got it back they immediately traded it in on a new Honda. I think this is a good strategy that I will certainly look into IF I EVER GET MY SANTA FE FIXED. So, I guess my next step is to file complaints with the state department of consumer affairs and the BBB but it's only been 2 weeks so not sure that is long enough for them to do anything. I already have over $1,000 tow and rental car in this already and estimates for transport to my dealer are around $700. Stay tuned, calling my "case manager" tomorrow.
 

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You should be good :). And hoping I'm good too. All SFs are made in Alabama, by the way. At least the ones for the US and Canada. But not sure what's the deal with the DCTs; my window sticker says they're made in 'USA/Korea'. Not sure what that means; if some are made in the US, and others in Korea, or just some components in Korea, and the rest here. At any rate, DCTs are different animals than a regular torque-converter (TC) auto, so if you want to minimize the wear on it, and also to enjoy it more, owners need to understand how they work. You probably know that already, but below is a good video to show that (and some comments below the video):


First thing is to avoid getting the tranny 'confused' where you know it'd get confused, like slowing down, and then needing to suddenly accelerate. In that case, you can downshift manually, so the tranny stays in gear, rather than disengaging the clutch, thinking you're going to stop. And if slowing down almost to a stop, downshift to 1st, so you can take off quickly. You can switch back to D with the 'D' button, or pushing the right (+) paddle for half a second (which is confirmed by an annoying 'beep'). A DCT keeps you more engaged than a regular transmission, and that's why I like them better than those, and use the paddles most of the time... but not everybody likes them. If there's no instance that you think it needs help, then perfect; you can just drive it in D. But at least now you'll know what to do if you ever catch the tranny flat-footed. Ha ha. Hope this helps.
So I watched that video and honestly, it confused me. Lol I learned to not creep along but that was about it. He might have been speaking French 😉😆
The DCT sounds sensitive so not sure what the advantage is to using them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It basically operates like a manual transmission, but without a clutch pedal. Have you ever driven a manual? But to answer your question, I have no freaking idea why Hyundai decided to use a DCT on a SF, to be honest. It's marginally more fuel efficient than a traditional torque-converter tranny, but hardly a reason to use one IMO. And I don't think it's cheaper either, so really stumped, as Hyundai seems to cut corners wherever it can. At least our tranny has wet clutches, making it more robust than the DCT-7s on 1.6T Hyundais, which have dry clutches (like the one the video dude was driving). But a TC tranny is typically even more robust, and without any 'weird' behavior. Anyway, ou basically want to engage the clutches as soon as possible, and with the least aggressive throttle as possible, if that makes sense. So no crawling without gas, or barely touching the gas. Get the vehicle going like above 10 mph, at which point the clutch should be fully engaged. Next time I drive mine will pay attention at which speed I feel it engaged, and pass it along.

MFBurns55, I'm really sorry to hear your disturbing story. And really happy I dodged that bullet when I was 2K miles away from home, because I was fearing something like that. But at 10 times the distance, it'd had been 10 times worse. Ha ha.

Finally, read that the recall 'fix' was to install software that prevents sudden disabling, but no word how long you can drive after the codes appear, and at what maximum speed. And the worst part is I think now I understand what's happening, thanks to the Kia recall. Hyundai's 03/31/22 threshold only means my SF (built Apr 09) already has that more gentle software fix, but still has a potentially bad HP pump. And the real problem was fixed until August, like Kia said. That's the only scenario that makes sense, but at least I feel better that if my SF happens to get hit by that problem, wouldn't leave me stranded in the middle of nowhere. But still want to learn more details, like how longer you could drive it, and how fast. I don't want to endanger myself, my family, and others going super slow on an interstate. If the speed is not at least 60, it'd be almost the same as getting stranded, as it wouldn't be safe to travel at 40 on an 80 TX highway. But I'd feel safe driving in the city with that fix for sure (which SFs built after 03/31/22 already have).
 

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It basically operates like a manual transmission, but without a clutch pedal. Have you ever driven a manual? But to answer your question, I have no freaking idea why Hyundai decided to use a DCT on a SF, to be honest. It's marginally more fuel efficient than a traditional torque-converter tranny, but hardly a reason to use one IMO. And I don't think it's cheaper either, so really stumped, as Hyundai seems to cut corners wherever it can. At least our tranny has wet clutches, making it more robust than the DCT-7s on 1.6T Hyundais, which have dry clutches (like the one the video dude was driving). But a TC tranny is typically even more robust, and without any 'weird' behavior. Anyway, ou basically want to engage the clutches as soon as possible, and with the least aggressive throttle as possible, if that makes sense. So no crawling without gas, or barely touching the gas. Get the vehicle going like above 10 mph, at which point the clutch should be fully engaged. Next time I drive mine will pay attention at which speed I feel it engaged, and pass it along.

MFBurns55, I'm really sorry to hear your disturbing story. And really happy I dodged that bullet when I was 2K miles away from home, because I was fearing something like that. But at 10 times the distance, it'd had been 10 times worse. Ha ha.

Finally, read that the recall 'fix' was to install software that prevents sudden disabling, but no word how long you can drive after the codes appear, and at what maximum speed. And the worst part is I think now I understand what's happening, thanks to the Kia recall. Hyundai's 03/31/22 threshold only means my SF (built Apr 09) already has that more gentle software fix, but still has a potentially bad HP pump. And the real problem was fixed until August, like Kia said. That's the only scenario that makes sense, but at least I feel better that if my SF happens to get hit by that problem, wouldn't leave me stranded in the middle of nowhere. But still want to learn more details, like how longer you could drive it, and how fast. I don't want to endanger myself, my family, and others going super slow on an interstate. If the speed is not at least 60, it'd be almost the same as getting stranded, as it wouldn't be safe to travel at 40 on an 80 TX highway. But I'd feel safe driving in the city with that fix for sure (which SFs built after 03/31/22 already have).
I don’t know how anyone could avoid creeping when driving in the city. I took that from that video and tried it out yesterday. Almost impossible and then on top, it made me super conscious. That is one sensitive transmission. Looking forward to hearing what you learn going forward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
With the creeping, you just have to engage the clutch (like 8-10 mph, I guess), then stop, preferably. And it's much worse when it's hot outside (summer), so don't worry too much about that now. DCTs are not that delicate, or shouldn't be, especially with wet clutches, like ours. We're talking about maximizing the clutches and transmission life. And to be honest, 'creeping' on a flat street is the least of the abusive behavior options, so don't worry about it, especially now that is cool outside. But next time I drive it will pay attention to the speedometer to give you some pointers :). I drive it by feel, since I'm used to driving manuals all my life, hence not knowing at which speed the clutch is engaged.
 

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With the creeping, you just have to engage the clutch (like 8-10 mph, I guess), then stop, preferably. And it's much worse when it's hot outside (summer), so don't worry too much about that now. DCTs are not that delicate, or shouldn't be, especially with wet clutches, like ours. We're talking about maximizing the clutches and transmission life. And to be honest, 'creeping' on a flat street is the least of the abusive behavior options, so don't worry about it, especially now that is cool outside. But next time I drive it will pay attention to the speedometer to give you some pointers :). I drive it by feel, since I'm used to driving manuals all my life, hence not knowing at which speed the clutch is engaged.
I appreciate your help and guidance. I drove a manual transmission back in high school but that was 30+ years ago. Lol When you say engage the clutch, are you meaning the brake? Can you please clarify? I know it might be a dumb question but I want to make sure that I know what you’re talking about. I will not worry about it right now as the temperature is cooler, even for Arizona. Lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The transmission has 2 clutches inside (hence the name DCT: dual clutch transmission). You should be able to feel when the clutch engages, since it's not as refined as a Porsche DCT, where it's more subtle. But once I try it, I'll be able to tell you at which speed it's fully engaged, so you know :). I like my SF because the shifting feels just like if I was driving a manual (when driving sedately), but without a clutch pedal. You can feel the slight delay between gears, one gear disengaging, and the other engaging. And first gear starts are unmistakable that a clutch is involved: you can feel the clutch slipping, then revs lower a little bit when it's fully clamped, while feeling the push forward. Really cool. Ha ha.
 
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