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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2019 Santa Fe Ultimate
Built: June 2019
Purchased: July 2019
Mileage: March 2021--14767
Burnsville Hyundai, Burnsville, MN

Some of you may recall when I wrote here 11 months ago about an oil analysis showing 5% fuel in the oil.

As suggested by members, corporate was involved to find a solution to fix the contamination.

The on-engine fuel pump was replaced. The fuel pressure sensor on the fuel rail was replaced. But the fuel injectors were never checked for leakage.

Corporate had the dealer perform oil changes and had me return after 1,000 miles to verify the increasing oil level on the dipstick. Each time a photo was taken of the dipstick showing levels above the "F" mark. The photos were forwarded as proof that fuel was contaminating the oil. Also, the smell of the fuel on the dipstick was obvious.

This practice continued for months. The last and final verification visit was on January 26, 2021. Then silence from the dealer and corporate until I questioned the dealer on March 4th.

The dealer's service manager called me on March 11th to inform me that Hyundai engineers have decided that nothing can be done and that this contamination is normal for these 2.0T engines. He claimed that I am the only person the dealership has ever encountered with oil contamination due to fuel in the crankcase.

Hyundai washed their hands of this problem. They are ignoring their own verification process. They refused to buy the Santa Fe back or even extensively examine the engine for the source of the problem.
So much for a 100,000 drive train warranty. This engine won't last that long with this much dilution.

This is our 4th Santa Fe, dating back to 2002, and will be our last Hyundai ever.
馃槩
 

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How does fuel get into the oil at such a rate? Are you having the petrol model vs diesel (I see you are in the US)? There must be a huge amount of blowby past the cylinders... And unburnt fuel??

Problem is its not a quick and easy fix. Poor response from hyundai. They are also contradicting themselves saying its normal but yet this hadn't happened to anyone else in their dealership. The least they could do is get a consistent storyline...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Chris 1975
The dealership is limited by Hyundai as to what they can do. Hyundai engineers had the dealership replace the high-pressure fuel pump on the engine and the fuel pressure sensor on the fuel rail.
The problem continued. And then the engineers said that nothing can be done to stop the contamination of the oil. Meanwhile, excessive wear is occurring due to lower oil viscosity. Hyundai has never checked the injectors for leaks.

It's a fact that unburned fuel is entering the crankcase. I have paid for several oil analyses proving that contamination is greater than 5 percent.
Hyundai may know that the GDI engines are well known for oil contamination. Other brands have had the same experience.
It was the dealer who claimed that it, the dealer, has never had a customer with this specific complaint.
Because of the dilution factor, both the filter and the oil has been changed 7 times with less than 14,000 miles on the engine.
Gasoline is not a good lubricant. Have your oil analyzed, or at least sniff the dipstick when checking the oil level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wish that I knew what they would do if that happened. They couldn't blame the lack of oil changes since that has been happening, up to now anyway, pretty close to every 2,000 miles.
 

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Hyundai engineers have decided that nothing can be done and that this contamination is normal for these 2.0T engines. He claimed that I am the only person the dealership has ever encountered with oil contamination due to fuel in the crankcase.
There is an obvious contradiction in those two statements any any lawyer could win a lawsuit using them. However, hiring a lawyer can be expensive, so I would look into small claims court, arbitration (which you probably agreed to when buying the car), or contacting a consumer affairs reporter at a local TV station.

You say that the motor oil has been changed every 2000 miles. Exactly what motor oil has been used in the vehicle (brand, type, viscosity, etc)?
 

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2019 Santa Fe Ultimate
Built: June 2019
Purchased: July 2019
Mileage: March 2021--14767
Burnsville Hyundai, Burnsville, MN

Some of you may recall when I wrote here 11 months ago about an oil analysis showing 5% fuel in the oil.

As suggested by members, corporate was involved to find a solution to fix the contamination.

The on-engine fuel pump was replaced. The fuel pressure sensor on the fuel rail was replaced. But the fuel injectors were never checked for leakage.

Corporate had the dealer perform oil changes and had me return after 1,000 miles to verify the increasing oil level on the dipstick. Each time a photo was taken of the dipstick showing levels above the "F" mark. The photos were forwarded as proof that fuel was contaminating the oil. Also, the smell of the fuel on the dipstick was obvious.

This practice continued for months. The last and final verification visit was on January 26, 2021. Then silence from the dealer and corporate until I questioned the dealer on March 4th.

The dealer's service manager called me on March 11th to inform me that Hyundai engineers have decided that nothing can be done and that this contamination is normal for these 2.0T engines. He claimed that I am the only person the dealership has ever encountered with oil contamination due to fuel in the crankcase.

Hyundai washed their hands of this problem. They are ignoring their own verification process. They refused to buy the Santa Fe back or even extensively examine the engine for the source of the problem.
So much for a 100,000 drive train warranty. This engine won't last that long with this much dilution.

This is our 4th Santa Fe, dating back to 2002, and will be our last Hyundai ever.
馃槩
Can you not apply the lemon law with them? I don鈥檛 know if that exists in your state; if so it鈥檚 time to apply it. That is bullshit how they are playing you. I would be on the horn with corporate. I鈥檓 sure you have... .
 

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There is an obvious contradiction in those two statements any any lawyer could win a lawsuit using them. However, hiring a lawyer can be expensive, so I would look into small claims court, arbitration (which you probably agreed to when buying the car), or contacting a consumer affairs reporter at a local TV station.

You say that the motor oil has been changed every 2000 miles. Exactly what motor oil has been used in the vehicle (brand, type, viscosity, etc)?
Check with a lawyer. For if he wins the case he can ask the judge to have Hyundai cover his legal fees.
 
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